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Impact of medical assistance in dying (MAiD) on family caregivers
  1. Rachel Goldberg1,2,
  2. Rinat Nissim1,2,3,
  3. Ekaterina An1 and
  4. Sarah Hales1,2,3
  1. 1 Supportive Care, Princess Margaret Hospital Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  2. 2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  3. 3 Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sarah Hales, Department of Supportive Care, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada; sarah.hales{at}uhn.ca

Footnotes

  • Contributors Literature search and review: RG. Manuscript writing: all authors. Final approval of the manuscript: all authors.

  • Funding This work was supported in part by the Comprehensive Research Experience for Medical Students (CREMS) Program at the University of Toronto and the Canadian Cancer Society (Grant #705663, February 2018–2021 [SH and RN]).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Literature search and review: RG. Manuscript writing: all authors. Final approval of the manuscript: all authors.

  • Funding This work was supported in part by the Comprehensive Research Experience for Medical Students (CREMS) Program at the University of Toronto and the Canadian Cancer Society (Grant #705663, February 2018–2021 [SH and RN]).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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