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P-239  Tomorrow’s carers – helping to unlock their potential!
  1. Tricia Wilcocks and
  2. Sue Marshall
  1. ellenor, Gravesend, UK

Abstract

Background The hospice identified previous work placements offered internally provided an inconsistency of experience for learners, with multiple requests placing a burden on care staff, resulting in a review of the model of student support. This closely related to influential factors for future work force planning as follows: increasing demand on health and social care services; growing role of hospices as educators; a need to influence student career choices as early as possible; reluctance to expose young people to direct care.

To extend opportunities, funding was obtained from Health Education England to trial different models of support.

Aims

  • Increase number of students experiencing hospice care

  • Provide alternative structured training models

  • Provide consistent positive experience of care delivery

  • Support workforce to stimulate student’s experiences.

Approach Comparison of two supported training models:

  1. One week accredited course

  2. Six month placement.

View this table:

A student’s conclusion – “I was relieved to find out we were being taught valuable skills on an actual course, not just making teas.”

Conclusion From successful pilot, we expect the following outcomes to shape future training:

  • Increase in students accessing and considering a career in care

  • Identify best approach to support students

  • Portable qualifications achieved

  • Focused opportunity for staff to support students.

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